History of the Rhine & Moselle
FRC-880064/879947 Rhine/Moselle
11 Nights from
£1,899
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Shortlist
Itinerary
1
Day 1
Amsterdam, Netherlands

Regarded as the Venice of the north, the Dutch capital of Amsterdam is made up of a series of 90 islands, which are connected by almost 1,200 bridges. Today, Amsterdam is a city of contrasts, with many people being attracted to this vibrant destination for its range of bars and night clubs. On the other hand, Amsterdam is home many renowned architectural structures, insightful museums and beautiful gardens.

The Royal Palace was originally built in the 17th century to serve as a town hall, but is now one of three palaces in the Netherlands to be under disposal of the monarchy. In the springtime, be sure to visit the Keukenhof Gardens, where seven million flower bulbs create a beautiful display of bold and bright colours.

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Day 2
Amsterdam, Netherlands - Rhine River, Rivers

Regarded as the Venice of the north, the Dutch capital of Amsterdam is made up of a series of 90 islands, which are connected by almost 1,200 bridges. Today, Amsterdam is a city of contrasts, with many people being attracted to this vibrant destination for its range of bars and night clubs. On the other hand, Amsterdam is home many renowned architectural structures, insightful museums and beautiful gardens.

The Royal Palace was originally built in the 17th century to serve as a town hall, but is now one of three palaces in the Netherlands to be under disposal of the monarchy. In the springtime, be sure to visit the Keukenhof Gardens, where seven million flower bulbs create a beautiful display of bold and bright colours.

Flowing through Germany, France, The Netherlands and the Alps of Switzerland is the greatest river of Europe, both culturally and historically: the Rhine. Running for 865 miles, the Rhine is navigable for River Cruise boats all the way from Switzerland to the North Sea. With steep rock cliffs and breath-taking vistas, the middle Rhine is the most spectacular and romantic reach of all. Most known for its castles, the middle Rhine is peppered with them, from the Ehrenfels Castle Ruins to the mighty Schönburg Castle.

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Day 3
Cologne, Germany

As the fourth largest city in Germany and the largest city on the Rhine River, Cologne is regarded as the historic, cultural and economic capital of the Rhineland. It is highly regarded for its trade fairs, cathedral, perfume, and Koelsch beer. It was also once a significant part of the Roman Empire, and the remains of many Roman buildings and town walls are still visible today. There is a range of Roman artefacts on display in the Roemisches Germanisches Museum, which is well worth a visit.

Cologne is also home to the French Gothic style Kolner Dom Cathedral, for which construction began in 1248 but remained unfinished for 600 years. The structure - which can still be visited today - is made up of two 157 metre-high spires, buttresses, pillars and arches – which collectively support the central nave. The remains of the kings who followed the star to Bethlehem are believed to have been contained within the south tower.

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Day 4
Koblenz, Germany

Originally founded as a Roman town in 9 BC, Koblenz is one of the oldest cities in Germany. Situated at the junction of the Rhine and Moselle River, it is surrounded by spurs of the Eifel, Hunsrück, Westerwald, and Taunus mountains. The point at which the two rivers meet is known as “Deutsches Eck (German Corner), which is the site of a settlement, founded in 1216 by German Knights, and today, it features an impressive monument dedicated to Kaiser Wilhelm I. Koblenz is home to a series of squares and statues which make for a pleasant stroll. There are also many historic structures in the city including the 13th century fortress, 18th century Electoral Palace and a series of medieval churches.

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Day 5
Rudesheim, Germany

Located at the foot of the Taunus Mountains and at the heart of the Rhine River is the town of Rudesheim. Being in the Rhine Gorge, Rudesheim is also part of the UNESCO World Heritage Site and is a historic winemaking town. Not only does the wine make this town worth visiting, but the Old Town itself and the picturesque Rheingau landscape and the romantic Rhine River itself.

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Day 6
Wertheim, Germany

The historical town of Wertheim am Main is situated at the confluence of the Main and Tauber rivers. Visitors can tour the ruins of Wertheim Castle, which offers great panoramic views over the medieval town centre and the surrounding hills.

The town comes to life during the summer months with Wertheim’s own version of Oktoberfest taking place and a medieval festival being held in the castle grounds. There is also a collection of designer outlet stores at Wertheim Village.

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Day 7
Wurzburg, Germany

Wurzburg is located in the German state of Bavaria, along the River Main. The Wurzburger Residenz and the Marienberg Fortress show off the impressive Baroque architecture found in this historic city and are two of the most popular places to visit.

Known as the city of 100 churches, many of these are still intact and help to give Wurzburg a fairytale feel. The most notable is Käppele, a small church known by this colloquial name and which features famous artworks and a chapel decorated with artificial bones and skulls. The city also lies within the Franconian wine region and is therefore a great place to taste some of the local vintages.

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Day 8
Bamberg, Germany

The south-central German river town of Bamberg has been recognised as a World Heritage site by UNESCO. Situated on the Regnitz River, north of Nuremberg, this gorgeous town is set amidst a series of picturesque rivers and forests. This perfectly preserved historic town is home to a range of architectural styles including Romanesque, Gothic, Renaissance and Baroque. Within the city, there are many historic structures and museums including the Alte Residenz (Old Palace), Neue Residenz, the former Benedictine abbey and an imperial cathedral which contains many notable statues. Additionally, there are nine breweries in Bamberg, offering a collective total of 200 types of beer.

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Day 9
Main-Danube Canal, Germany

Flowing a total distance of 106 miles, the Main-Danube Canal winds through rural Bavaria from Bamberg, on the Main River, to Kelheim, on the Danube. This provides the opportunity for river cruisers to embark on a 2,200-mile journey from the North Sea to the Black Sea. It was one of the largest civil engineering projects in history and was built with a total of 16 locks, each of which is around 625 feet long, 40 feet wide, and 100 feet deep.

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Day 10
Regensburg, Germany

Situated along the banks of the Danube River is the Bavarian city of Regensburg. A cultural centre of Germany, the cities medieval heart is now a UNESCO World Heritage Site, boasting one of the most important Gothic churches in Bavaria, St. Peter’s Cathedral. With a stunning 14th century stained glass window and two Romanesque chapels, St. Peter’s in one of the main attractions in Regensburg. Full of history, the city also offers other notable examples of Romanesque architecture, including the Porta Praetoria, which dates back to 179 AD. Despite the repeated bombings of WW2, Regensburg’s medieval buildings and charm has survived, and sustained little damage.

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