Treasures of Burgundy & Provence
FRC-592640/381976 Rhone/Saone
8 Nights
Price on Request
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Shortlist
Itinerary
1
Day 1
Lyon, France

Located in east-central France is the nation’s second largest city of Lyon, which is where the Rhone and Saône Rivers meet. It is particularly known for its gastronomy and La-Croix-Rousse (old silk-weaving area). The Fouviere Hill offers an opportunity to admire the entire city, which offers a fine blend of new and historic elements. The old quarter is home to the 12-15th century Cathedral of St. Jean and many elegant 15th century mansions, while the new town boasts a modern, business commercial centre and the Gerland Quarter with a marina and park.

2
Day 2
Macon, France

Situated in east-central France, on the right bank of the Saône, is the small city of Mâcon. It is located near the Maconnais and Beaujolais Vineyards, where renowned wines such as Pouilly Fouisse, Julienas, and Moulin à Vent are produced. At the Maison Maconnaise de vins, you can taste a selection of fine vintage wines and sample a number of regional dishes. One of the city’s most intriguing landmarks is the ‘Maison du Bois Dore’ – a strange wooden house, which was built around 1500 and houses a bar and café, as well as an archaeological museum.

3
Day 3
Chalon-Sur-Saone, France

Labelled an important port since ancient times, Chalon-Sur-Saone was once the capital of the Kingdom of Burgundy and Julius Caesar even declared it as his winter headquarters. Today, it is home to a series of fine quays, which border the Saone River at its junction for the Canal du Centre. Every year, the city hosts a number carnivals and traditional festivals, with themes focussing on giant masks, street performers, and film. Within Chalon-Sur-Saone, you will find two historic churches: the former Cathedral (now church) of Saint-Vincent- which dates back to the 13th and 14th centuries, and the Church of Saint-Pierre – founded in the 17th century. More recently, it was the birthplace of Nicephore Niepce, who invented photography and there is a museum in Chalon-Sur-Saone built in his honour.

3
Day 3
Tournus, France

The town of Tournus is entered through a gateway comprising a medieval tower on each side. Located on the banks of the River Saone the town and its port have considerable commerce and wine and stone from the nearby quarries. Surrounded by vineyard and full of narrow streets, Tournus has the inward looking feel of a Mediterranean town. The town skyline is dominated by The Cloister of St Philibert, one of the oldest Romanesque buildings in Burgundy dating back to 900AD.

4
Day 4
Lyon, France

Located in east-central France is the nation’s second largest city of Lyon, which is where the Rhone and Saône Rivers meet. It is particularly known for its gastronomy and La-Croix-Rousse (old silk-weaving area). The Fouviere Hill offers an opportunity to admire the entire city, which offers a fine blend of new and historic elements. The old quarter is home to the 12-15th century Cathedral of St. Jean and many elegant 15th century mansions, while the new town boasts a modern, business commercial centre and the Gerland Quarter with a marina and park.

5
Day 5
Avignon, France

Enclosed by medieval walls, the city of Avignon is the capital of the Vaucluse department in the Provence-Alpes-Côte-d'Azur region in south-eastern France. Within the medieval walls lie a series of museums, churches, palaces. The Palais des Papes was originally built as a fortress and its features include two graceful towers, large stone vaults, battlements and sluices – which were used for pouring hot oil on attackers. Elsewhere in the city, there is a lively local market where you can discover a range of fantastic local products including wine, flour, oil, leather, soap and fabrics.

6
Day 6
Arles, France

Situated in south-eastern France, the city of Arles was deemed highly significant during the eras of the Ligurian tribes and the Roman Empire. Remains of an ancient roman wall surround the old town still stand today, while an amphitheatre capable of holding 20,000 spectators is one of the city’s most impressive landmarks. Many excavations have taken place in the city over years, with various works of art having been discovered including the “Venus d’Arles”, which is currently on display in the Louvre. Art is certainly a common theme within Arles, and this becomes more apparent upon learning that the city was the home of world-renowned painter Vincent Van Gogh.

7
Day 7
Viviers, France

Dating back to the 5th century, Viviers is located on France’s Rhone River. It has a two-tiered system, with a lower town once being home to the tradesmen and an upper town where the higher classes once lived. The latter is walled and features an attractive warren of narrow cobbled streets with Renaissance stone houses, a Romanesque cathedral, and a castle terrace where fantastic views of the rooftops and river below can be found.

The Ardeche region, of which Viviers is part, is famous for the Pont d'Arc, the largest natural arch in Europe, and its truffle farms. From Viviers you can visit Nyons to see a working lavender distillery and tour an ancient XVIII century olive mill.

8
Day 8
Lyon, France

Located in east-central France is the nation’s second largest city of Lyon, which is where the Rhone and Saône Rivers meet. It is particularly known for its gastronomy and La-Croix-Rousse (old silk-weaving area). The Fouviere Hill offers an opportunity to admire the entire city, which offers a fine blend of new and historic elements. The old quarter is home to the 12-15th century Cathedral of St. Jean and many elegant 15th century mansions, while the new town boasts a modern, business commercial centre and the Gerland Quarter with a marina and park.